finding prostate cancer alot like finding fish


About two years ago in Georgia we had quite the drought. Lake Lanier and its main resource the Chattahoochee River were way down. Up in North Georgia where the river is small, the effect of the drought exposed all the rocks or “Shoals” as we call them in the river. This was terrible for the rafting industry because of the troubles with navigating the rocks made a two hour delightful trip down the river painstakingly slow. The river being narrow and the shoals being exposed was absolute heaven for the fisherman and in particular me. I must have caught a thousand “shoalies” that summer. I’d go up to my little cabin, tie some top water poppers for my fly rod, get in the kayak and jump from rock to rock hitting all the holes. What a joy it was! As I was in rapture with the fishing, my friend that ran the river float shop was lamenting.  “One man’s loss is another’s gain”
Now on the biopsy thing here is the analogy. Less water , same amount of fish, more fish caught. Less prostate, same amount of cancer, more positive biopsies. I don’t know really what to take away from this article, maybe do a few more biopsies on larger glands?
See…everything goes back to fishing and water and dogs.
Chattahoochee River-Cherokee for "Painted Rock"

 

UroToday.com – With regard to the prognostic factors predicting the diagnosis of prostate cancer, in our analysis, prostate volume was the unique clinical and pathological variable significantly associated with the incidence of prostate cancer in multivariate analysis [1]. Specifically, patients with prostate ranging from 40 to 60 cc or larger than 60 cc had a 6-fold lower risk of harboring cancer, compared to those patients with less than 40 cc prostate. Interestingly, only a few other studies had previously shown that prostate volume was a powerful predictor of the presence of prostate cancer at repeated transrectal biopsy, [2-4] but only a single study had suggested a similar finding in patients undergoing transperineal biopsy[5].

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s