Risk of infection with prostate biopsy versus the risk of not diagnosing prostate cancer. Which is worse?


"Nothing is so strong as gentleness, nothing so gentle as real strength" - St. Francis de Sales

When I was a kid and grocery shopping with my mother the first place I went in the store was to the butcher department.

“May I have some bones for my dog please.” The butcher dutifully disappeared and returned with about five or six bones all wrapped up and gave them to me. Free of charge. I loved it, my dogs loved it and I thought of myself as being smart. It was great getting something useful for nothing and only because I had the courage to ask. Above Penelope is making quite the mess of our outdoor sofa with a bone that I got at the grocery but paid for. She loved it and ate every bit of it and it occupied her for about 30 minutes. I took the picture because she had two feet on the floor and two on the sofa so that she could get “good leverage” on that ole bone, that means it “were a good one.”

Don’t judge me on letting a dog eat a bone on outdoor furniture. The stain you see looks worse that it really is. Really.

A politician who had recently lost an election told a friend that he was disappointed that he had not contributed to his campaign.

The friend said, ” Well…you didn’t ask.”

What was the bible says about asking….hmmmmmmmm?

 

Well….just don’t do it….now where are you? Can you live with your abnormal PSA or not? Other than tissue (from a biopsy) all other things are “suggestive” of prostate cancer.

What would I tell you having done thousands of biopsies and had one myself? The risk of an infection is about 3% and the patient and doctor should have a heightened sense of awareness about fever.  If a temperture is developing then contact or get back to the urologist as soon as possible. What is probably happening is that the urologist gave you Cipro and the infection is not sensitive to it. A culture should be done quickly and a broader spectrum antibiotic given. In my office I have third generation cephlasporins available to give IM that sometimes will avert a hospitalization and used as a daily IM shot untill the culture is back. I admit about 2 people a year from infection after a biopsy and it is a frustrating situation because the bacteria is one that is not sensitive to the usual oral antibiotics and require antibiotics that can only be given by IM or IV administration.

Prostate Biopsy Risk?

Story Updated: Oct 5, 2011

In today’s health news: A danger from prostate screening that might catch guys by surprise.

Every year, millions of men have the familiar PSA test that can point to possible prostate cancer. The test is quick and simple – but it can have serious downsides.

In a new study from the Journal of Urology, researchers looked at Medicare records of men ages 65 and older who underwent a prostate biopsy. Doctors may want to do this procedure Рwhich involves taking a sample of prostate tissue Ð when a PSA test looks suspicious. They compared more than 17,000 men who had a prostate biopsy with nearly 135,000 similar men who didn’t have one.

Nearly 7 percent of the men in the biopsy group were hospitalized within 30 days, compared to just 2.9 percent of the other men. The men who went to the hospital after their biopsy had complications including bleeding and infection, as well as episodes of other problems like heart failure.

The American Cancer Society doesn’t specifically recommend that men should have the PSA test. It merely suggests that men should get familiar with the possible benefits of testing – and of course the risks – then talk to their doctor about whether testing is the right choice starting at age 45 to 50.

I’m Dr. Cindy Haines of HealthDay TV, with the news that doctors are reading; health news that matters to you.

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